Deep Sky Imaging

January 27, 2017.  The image of the belt and sword region of Orion is a 25 minute integrated exposure taken with the ASI174MC camera and a 55mm camera lens working at f/4.  The gain was set at 179 which corresponds to unity gain in this camera and the exposure time was 20 seconds per frame.  A total of 75 frames were combined in Autostakkert and processed in Photoshop and Photomatix to give the above result.  Some haze was developing towards the end of the exposures and prevented further imaging.  The camera was attached to the Losmandy rail on the G11 mount of my C14 and simply tracked.  No guiding corrections were made.  In addition to M42 in the lower right we see the Flame Nebula and Horse Head Nebula in the upper left.

May 27, 2016.  Testing new ASI-1600MM camera without cooling.  Set of  294 images of 0.54 seconds exposure.  Aligned and stacked in MaximDL.  No darks or flats.  CPC-1100EdgeHD, f/10.

March 18, 2015.  Tonight I tried out the new ASI120MC CMOS camera from ZWO.  I attached it to my 80mm, f/5 guide scope and took a 300 second raw avi file of 10 second exposures and aligned and stacked it in Registax6.

January 22, 2015.  After a lot of lost motion after losing my computer to the cold weather (I turned it off over Christmas and it got very cold and the mother board failed), reinstalling all my software on a new computer and learning how to use the full version of MaximDL with my Orion StarShoot Pro Deep Space Color Imager, I am back in business.  Above is an HDR version of a 25 minute integration time image of M42, the Orion Nebula. It is a stack of fifty 30 second images taken at the f/10 focus of my Celestron 11inch EdgeHD with the SSDSCI.  Below is a normal image, showing the outer nebulosity but with the Trapezium region blown out completely.

                                               M74 reprocessed as HDR image


                                               M31, The Andromeda Galaxy



                                                   M42, The Orion Nebula


November 27, 2014.  Thanksgiving Day.  Downloaded Photomatix Essentials and used it to create a HDR (High Dynamic Range) version of the image of the Orion Nebula and The Andromeda Galaxy, M31.  Note that the Trapezium is visible in the middle of the brightest part of the Orion Nebula and that the faint outer detail is also visible.

November 21, 2014.  Calm and clear tonight, but cold.  I set up the CPC-1100EdgeHD with the Orion SSDSI at its native f/10 configuration (no focal reducer) and took a set of thirty unguided 10 second exposures of the Orion Nebula.  Star images stayed reasonably round for no guiding.  I took a set of five darks and five flats, also at 10 seconds exposure.  MaximDL was then used to calibrate, color convert and stack the individual exposures to give the result shown above.

M27 at f/10 and f/7
M27 at f/10 and f/7

October 27, 2014.  Tonight I imaged M27 again, but this time using the new 0.7x focal reducer giving me f/7 from the CPC-1100 EdgeHD rather than the native f/10.  I managed a slightly longer exposure, 92 minutes vs 80 minutes in the image of September 26, but the big improvement in image density is the faster focal ratio, about 1-1/3 stops faster.

M42, The Orion Nebula
M42, The Orion Nebula

October 24, 2014. Orion was high this morning when I got up to observe the eclipse of Callisto by Io, so I spent a little time taking this image of M42 using the SSDSI at the f/7 reduced focus of the CPC-1100 EdgeHD.  The above image was obtained from four light exposures of 1 minute each and a single dark.  No flats.  Obviously, needs more integration time.  We'll do better.

Veil Nebula West, NGC6960
Veil Nebula West, NGC6960

October 16, 2014.  My 2" sky fog filter came from Orion today.  I installed it on the nosepiece of the SSDSCI and re-oriented the camera so that south would be to the left in the images.  When twilight was nearly gone, I set up on Altair, did a good focus with the Bahtinov mask and pointed the telescope at NGC6960. I set up the Orion autoguider on the bright central star in the nebula and set the camera to acquire eighty 60 second images.  Unfortunately, the sky became partly cloudy after the 32nd exposure and I had to quit after taking a set of five 60 second darks, five 20 second darks and five 20 second flats.  After calibrating and stacking and extreme histogram stretching I got the result shown above.  Obviously I am going to need a lot longer integration time than 32 minutes.  The Veil is beginning to show up, however, and the color is nice.  I don't know why the overexposure halo around the central bright star (52 Cygni) is off center.  Have not noticed that before.  I wonder if the new filter is tilted?

M31, Great Andromeda Galaxy, central regions
M31, Great Andromeda Galaxy, central regions

October 12, 2014. 

My System
My System

October 8, 2014.  My 0.7x focal reducer came in from Celestron today.  I mounted it directly on the 3" threaded hub on the backplate of my CPC-1100 EdgeHD and threaded the Baader motorized Crayford focuser directly on the back of the lens.  The optical path taken up by the focuser was almost a perfect match for the spacing recommended by Celestron, needing only a half inch extension on the drawtube of the focuser to make it perfect.  The system is shown above.  The image below is the result of stacking 30 one minute guided exposures, calibrating and converting to color before stacking.  Note the contrasting colors of the two brightest stars in the image.  The one near the upper edge is a type A2 blue giant and the one in the lower right is a much closer K2 orange dwarf.

M13, Globular Cluster in Hercules
M13, Globular Cluster in Hercules
M74
M74

October 5, 2014.  Although the moonlight was much too bright for good deep sky imaging, I made the attempt on the spiral galaxy M74, for practice guiding if nothing else.  The SSDSI color camera was used at the f/10 focus of the CPC-1100 Edge HD telescope. Scattered blue light from the moonlight gave a pronounced blue hue to everything.  The image above is the result of removing the blue channel entirely and converting the red and green channels to monochrome.  19 five minute exposures were calibrated, color converted, aligned and stacked to give this image with a 95 minute integration time.  I will do better on a good dark night.  The actual color image is shown below.  The blue background is moonlight scattered off the atmosphere just like sunlight makes the sky look blue in the daytime.  M74 is only 32 million light years away.  Practically in the neighborhood.

M13, The Globular Cluster in Hercules
M13, The Globular Cluster in Hercules

October 4, 2014.  Here is an image of M13 taken with the Orion StarShoot Deep sky imager at the f/10 focus of the CPC-1100 EdgeHD telescope.  It is a stack of 78 images of 40 seconds exposure for a total integration time of 53 minutes.  Calibrated, color converted, aligned and stacked in MaximDL

M27, The Dumbbell Nebula
M27, The Dumbbell Nebula

September 26, 2014.  Tonight everything worked very well.  Guiding was spot on and I managed to take 120 forty second exposures of M27 with the Orion SSDSI one shot color camera at the f/10 focus of the CPC-1100 EdgeHD. I also took a set of 5 darks at 40 seconds exposure.  The next day I got a set of 5 flats at 3 seconds exposure and the darks to go with them.  Processing in MaximDL gave the result above.  The faintest stars are approaching 18th magnitude and quite round all the way to the corners of the giant 25x18mm CCD (3040x2024 pixels) of the camera.  The above image is a cropped 1479x1379 pixel region around the nebula.

M57, the Ring Nebula
M57, the Ring Nebula

September 23, 2014.  Here's the improvement obtained by 480 seconds integration compared to only 120 seconds in the picture taken on September 18.  Again, taken with the Orion StarShoot Pro Color Imager II at the f/10 focus of my C-11 EdgeHD telescope.  18 exposures of 30 seconds each were calibrated and combined in MaximDL6. 

 

Above is an image of M57, the Ring Nebula taken with the same equipment with an integration time of 540 seconds.

M27, the Dumbbell Nebula
M27, the Dumbbell Nebula
M27
M27

September 18, 2014.  I am slowly learning how to use my Orion StarShoot Pro Color imager with the CPC1100EdgeHD and the Orion Autoguider.  The above image is a stack of only six 20 second guided exposures at the f/10 focus of the telescope.  When I could keep the guider working, it did well, but eventually lost the guide star after only a few exposures.  I took flats today and used them in processing the raw color images with MaximDL (boxcar flats).  Only 5 of the 20 second images were used to make this final result.  What would this look like with an hour of integration rather than only 100 seconds?

Saturn July 17, 2013
Saturn July 17, 2013
The CPC-1100EdgeHD
The CPC-1100EdgeHD

The C14 retired from           Jenny Jump

Jupiter, September 11, 2013
Jupiter, September 11, 2013
7.25" Schupmann Medial
7.25" Schupmann Medial
Jupiter September 9, 2013
Jupiter September 9, 2013
12.5" Newtonian
12.5" Newtonian
Mars August 18, 2003
Mars August 18, 2003
Venus March 11, 2012
Venus March 11, 2012
Mercury July 30, 2013
Mercury July 30, 2013
The Sun August 14, 2010
The Sun August 14, 2010
The Moon May 17, 2005
The Moon May 17, 2005
Lunar Terminator Strip 3/12/11
Lunar Terminator Strip 3/12/11